How to Handle Cat Hairballs

Dec_2013_3Is your cat producing a lot of hairballs? Although they’re a common byproduct of feline hygiene, hairballs can cause blockages or become an excessive problem. Follow these tips to help your cat cough up fewer hairballs:

  • Hairballs are made up of loose hair swallowed during daily grooming. They’re matted bits of hair, usually in a tubular shape. Although they can pass through into the cat’s stool, they’re often expelled by vomiting.
  • Brush your cat to help cut down the loose hair she can ingest. If your cat has long hair, she should be brushed daily. A Furminator Deshedding tool or a cat grooming brush can help tame her fur. Continue reading

Pet Safety Tips for Happy Vacation Trips

Dec_2014_1If you’re preparing to hit the road or take to the skies this summer, there are a few things you should keep in mind if Fido is traveling along.

While we now have many pet-friendly options available, attention to a few details will ensure happy tails on your happy trails.

On the road:

  • Make sure you have a sturdy pet crate or carrier for safety in the car, hotel or both. It should be large enough for your pet to stand, lie down and turn around.
  • Feed Fido a light meal 3 or 4 hours before hitting the road.
  • Never leave your pet alone in a parked car, even with the windows open!
  • Does your dog have a travel kit? Create one with his food/water bowls, leash, bags for waste, Continue reading

Kyjen Invincibles Flappy Friends™

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If your dog loves to play with socks, he’ll love Kyjen® Invincible® Flappy Friends™! Modeled after socks, these plush buddies can provide serious playtime with rip-resistant material and fun squeakers.

Your dog’s new Flappy Friends offer …

  • A nubby texture and tough material
  • Two squeakers that squeak even when punctured
  • Simple construction and embroidered facial features that can’t be chewed off
  • The flap-ability dogs love with the durability you will love
  • Designed for supervised play only, not for aggressive chewers

You know you need a new bird cage when…

July_2013_1Does Polly need a new home? You know she needs a new bird cage when…

There’s not as much room as you thought

Anyone can make a mistake. Not getting a large enough cage is a serious one as it can affect your bird’s comfort, movement, safety and even behavior. For these reasons, it’s best to buy the largest cage you can afford.

The cage door is broken or has been “fixed”

Did the door hinge break? It happens and you may be tempted to fix it with twist ties, binders or clips. But consider how this compromises the cage’s safety. Your bird may see the item as her new chew toy or may get her wing or foot caught in the extra space that’s now available.

The debris guard is cracked or missing

If the plastic tray at the bottom of the cage gets chipped or cracked, we advise against taping it or using a sheet of cardboard. Your bird’s curiosity or love of chewing (or both) will drive her to investigate this new material, which can be harmful if ingested. Any sharp edges that get exposed through the tape can also be a hazard. Continue reading

Helping Cats Who Fear Guests

Dec_2013_3

If you’re the parent of a fearful kitty, you’re used to seeing her scoot away and hide at the first sign of a house guest. Want some tips to help her feel more comfortable around visitors?  Focus on encouraging and rewarding her while you try these steps:

  • It’s best to let your cat approach guests. Visitors, especially children, who try to follow your cat to pet her may only frighten her more. Ask guests to let her approach instead.
  • Movement, noise and size count. Ask a friend to squat down or sit still while avoiding eye contact with your cat. This will seem less intimidating and may get her to approach.
  • With your guest on the far side of the room, offer your cat a treat or encourage her to play at a distance. Continue reading

Swimming Safety for Pooches in Pools

Dec_2014_1

Does your pooch love to swim? Whether he jumps in the water with glee or dips his toe in nervously, there are things you can do to ensure he’s safe.

Follow these safety precautions while at the pool, beach or lake this summer:

  • Never let your dog swim without supervision – Always keep a watchful eye on Fido, especially as he’s entering or leaving the water. He’s most vulnerable at these moments.
  • Buy your dog a life jacket – Just as humans can get exhausted, be overwhelmed by waves or get muscle cramps, so can dogs. A life jacket such as the Fido Float will help him stay afloat. Continue reading

Why Ferrets Are Good Pets

Aug_2013_1

Although they’re appearing more often in movies and TV, ferrets are still misunderstood. They’re playful, intelligent creatures and can be a lot of fun to watch. We’ve listed a few reasons why they make good pets.

Ferrets are…

Friendly
Although they’re independent, Ferrets often seek attention and enjoy being with their human family.

Playful
Ferrets never lose their curiosity and enthusiasm for play, which makes them fun to watch. If you keep two ferrets, they will have you laughing with their antics as they play together. Continue reading

Caring for Cat Paws

Dec_2013_3

Your cat’s healthy paws allow her to be the feline acrobat she is. To maintain those paws (and avoid cat prints on your favorite furniture), it’s important to clean and check them often. Here are some tips:

Wipe them clean

Indoor cats can get dirt or cleaning chemicals on their paws. Check her feet daily and wipe them with a damp cloth while you look between her toes for dirt or foreign objects.

Tweeze it out

If you do find a splinter or object between her toes, use tweezers to remove it. Then wash the area and use an antiseptic on any small cuts. Any wounds with blood, pus or unusual odors should be checked for infection by a vet. Continue reading

Do You Know the Symptoms of Heatstroke?

Dec_2014_1

Heatstroke. It’s one of the hazards of playing outdoors in the summer–for dogs and humans alike.

But since dogs don’t sweat the way humans do, they rely on panting and sweating through the pads of their feet. This isn’t a very efficient process, especially for short-nosed breeds, like pugs, bulldogs, boxers and Pekinese.

When outdoors, keep an eye on your dog’s behavior. If it’s hot and your dog is acting strangely, it may be your first sign of a problem. Here are others:

The signs of heatstroke

  • Rapid heartbeat
  • Heavy panting
  • Bright red tongue
  • Red or pale gums
  • Thick, tacky saliva Continue reading

Stop Food Gulping with the Gobble Stopper

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Does your dog gobble his food too quickly? The Gobble Stopper slows down feeding and helps prevent bloating (the #2 health risk for dogs), gas, choking, and vomiting.

The unique design forces dogs to slow down and eat around it. It also turns ANY bowl into a slow feeder. Simply attach it with the suction-cup bottom and remove it with the easy-lift tab. It’s available in three sizes, is top-rack dishwasher safe and is phthalate and BPA free.